Cancer survivor says thank you to Rosemere with an abseil

Diane Ingrey
Diane Ingrey

A woman who has battled cancer took fund-raising to new highs and lows when she abseiled 90ft down a Lancashire quarry.

Diane Ingrey, of Chorley, chose to abseil down Denham Quarry as a way of saying thank you to Rosemere Cancer Centre, where she was treated after being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014.
The 62-year-old mother-of-one said: “I have never smoked and I’ve always kept myself fit but following a routine mammogram in October 2014, I was diagnosed with breast cancer.
“It came as a total shock. I was devastated. I am a strong character but I didn’t know if I was going to live or die and needed support like never before.
“Luckily I found that at Rosemere Cancer Centre.
“Nothing is ever the same again after a diagnosis of cancer but the staff at the centre, together with the physiotherapists at Chorley and South Ribble Hospital helped give me my life back.
“The staff at both sites have been fantastic and really helped me at a bad time.
“To show my thanks, I decided to support the 20 Years Anniversary Appeal in a way that was a challenge. I had never abseiled before and it was very scary, especially going forwards.
“The fact that I have done this with cancer makes me proud. But the next day I had to rest.
“People think once you get over cancer, that is it, but there are side effects. I suffer with some joint inflammation because of the trauma of the cancer.
“I still have breast cancer - it can never be cured. I just have to live with the uncertainty. It is hard, but I have learnt to deal with it.”
Not only did Diane abseil in the normal way, but encouraged by abseil experts and event facilitators Mountain Monkeys, she also abseiled the drop forwards in a diving position.
She also roped in another 50 people, including son Roger, 28, and colleagues from her workplace, Skelmersdale Jobcentre, along with jobcentre staff from across Lancashire.
Stylists from Trimmers hair salon, in Skelmersdale, friends from her line dancing group, in Walmer Bridge and Preston, and Southport Fell Walking also joined her in a feat that is set to raise more than £5,000.
Diane added: “When I told people at work what I planned to do, many came forward to join me, including some with a genuine fear of heights. All of us have either had cancer or are close to someone touched by the disease.
“I wanted as many people as possible to join me so we had more sources of money coming in. I still attend Rosemere and there is so much suffering there. More needs to be done.”
Rosemere Cancer Foundation’s 20 Years Anniversary Appeal launched in March to celebrate the two-decade anniversary of the opening of Rosemere Cancer Centre.
It has an ambitious £1.5m target to equip the centre with the world’s most advanced robotic surgical system to enable more patients to undergo keyhole surgery.
It is also funding a state-of-the-art research facility and plans to modernise its in-patient Ribblesdale Ward.
For further information on the appeal and how to donate, visit http://www.rosemere.org.uk
To donate to Diane’s event, visit http://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Diane-Ingrey1

Diane Ingrey and her son Roger

Diane Ingrey and her son Roger

For other stories on Rosemere fund-raising click here /furness-building-society-wear-it-red-for-rosemere-1-8532629 and /rosemere-s-1-5m-campaign-to-fund-robot-cancer-surgeon-1-8414713

Chorley Jobcentres Janet Anders and Jane Griffiths

Chorley Jobcentres Janet Anders and Jane Griffiths

Leyland Jobcentre abseilers, from left to right, Donna Wainwright, Cherly Baxendale and Prity Patel

Leyland Jobcentre abseilers, from left to right, Donna Wainwright, Cherly Baxendale and Prity Patel