Dangerous craze sees teens skate on roof

Roof skating: Whittle-le-Woods CE Primary School is the scene of a dangerous new craze.
Roof skating: Whittle-le-Woods CE Primary School is the scene of a dangerous new craze.

Teenagers are risking their lives inline skating on a Chorley primary school roof.

The boys were spotted using the 20ft high roof of Whittle-le-Woods CE Primary School as a skatepark to practice stunts in the evenings.

Headteacher Clare Berryman fears it could be a new craze and believes it is only a matter of time before someone gets seriously hurt.

She said: “I’m worried it could become the next trend. Some of the roof is flat and some of it is ramped, and they’re using all of it like a skate park.

“It’s very dangerous and is an accident waiting to happen.”

She described the sport as being similar to free-running, a form of ‘urban acrobatics’ in which people use buildings, walls and other structures to move around. Only this time, she added, it is on wheels.

She said there are a handful of teenage boys who congregate at the Preston Road primary school to take part in the new-found hobby during the evenings, and she has concerns it could become even more popular this week after staff and pupils were off for half-term.

“They’ve met there twice in the past two weeks,” she said. “But I don’t know if that will go up.

“It happens during the evenings, and the first time was when a keep fit class was taking place.

“The ladies heard an almighty noise, and it was some boys skating on the roof. They couldn’t believe it.”

She is also fearful the youths could cause damage to the roof, which was replaced last August.

Thousands of pounds had to be forked out after broken tiles caused a major leak when thieves stripped lead from it in September.

Now, Mrs Berryman hopes the new ‘roof skating’ trend will not result in the school being hit financially again, and also hopes nobody gets hurt.

“People in the area must have seen it happening,” she said. “So I hope they’ll contact the police if the lads come back in future, because it has to stop.”

The Guardian contacted the police but was told that nobody has been in touch with them about the problem.

A spokesman said they were unable to comment unless it was officially reported.