Getting muddy to honour a former colleague

South Ribble Borough Council staff who are taking part in Pretty Muddy in memory of their colleague Allyson Wright who died earlier this year
South Ribble Borough Council staff who are taking part in Pretty Muddy in memory of their colleague Allyson Wright who died earlier this year

A team of friends from South Ribble Borough Council are preparing to take part in Cancer Research UK’s Pretty Muddy challenge in memory of a colleague who lost her battle with the illness earlier this year.

Benefits assessor Allyson Wright, died in February, aged 54.

Allyson Wright, of Chorley, who died of cancer in February, aged 54

Allyson Wright, of Chorley, who died of cancer in February, aged 54

Her colleague and friend, Amy Kenyon, of Penwortham, came up with the idea of forming a group to take on the Pretty Muddy obstacle course in Moor Park, Preston, on Saturday June 17.

They have called themselves the Muddy Muckers and have even persuaded two of their daughters to join in, making up a team of ten.

Amy, 34, who is a senior benefits officer, says: “Allyson had worked for the council for 20 years and was extremely popular amongst her colleagues.

“She was very much a people person and a larger than life character who would go out of her way to help other people.

Last year's 
Race for Life Pretty Muddy at Moor Park, Preston

Last year's Race for Life Pretty Muddy at Moor Park, Preston

“This is a great way for us to come together and do something special in her memory.

“She didn’t want to be forgotten and would love that we have planned to do this for her.”

Allyson, of Chorley, joined the council in 1997 and was based at the Civic Centre in Leyland.

Always compassionate, she was the council’s liaison with Clare House Women’s Refuge, helping victims of domestic violence rebuild their lives.

Last year's 
Race for Life Pretty Muddy at Moor Park, Preston

Last year's Race for Life Pretty Muddy at Moor Park, Preston

She was diagnosed with cancer last summer and showed tremendous strength and bravery in her fight against the condition

Doctors told Allyson in July that they had found a tumour on her left kidney and they removed it in August.

Allyson started chemotherapy towards the end of November but tragically, the cancer spread to her lungs in the new year and Allyson’s health deteriorated.

At the beginning of February, she was able to spend a week with her son Liam, grandson Oscar and granddaughter Gracie, who had travelled from Australia.

Cancer Research UK logo

Cancer Research UK logo

Allyson sadly died on 19 February – a month before her 55th birthday.

Amy adds: “Everybody at the council liked Allyson and we were all wishing her well so the news was difficult for us all.

“The turnout at Allyson’s funeral at St Peter’s Church in Chorley was really high and many of her colleagues attended, as we all wanted to pay our respects.”

Some South Ribble Borough Council staff have already raised £235 for the Rosemere Cancer Foundation in Allyson’s memory.

They were keen to keep the fund-raising efforts going and so signed up a team for Pretty Muddy.

The Muddy Muckers are: Amy Kenyon, Kat Beswick, Sarah Prescott and her daughter Phoebe, Lynn Stephenson, Suzanne Ravenscroft and her daughter Beth, Kath Perplus, Sarah Uren and Louise Wildman.

Amy adds: “We’ve all been training and are intending to train together in the run up to the big day.

“It’s really nice for us to all come together for such a brilliant cause. Cancer is something that has affected all of us in some way.”

The team have done a fabulous job with fund-raising and have so far raised more than £850.

To make a donation visit www.tinyurl.com/prettymuddyallyson.

Race for Life 5k, 10k and Pretty Muddy events, in partnership with Tesco, will be held at Moor Park over the weekend of Saturday, June 17 and Sunday, June 18.

Every day, around 110 people are diagnosed with cancer in the North West.

That’s why Cancer Research UK is calling on women across the region to fight back against this devastating disease by signing up to Race for Life now. Money raised through Race for Life helps to make long-term research and pioneering trials possible, leading to new tests, kinder treatments and cures, which could save the lives of more people across the North West.