Historic pillars are crumbling and unsafe

Popular wedding venue: Farington Lodge, off Stanifield Lane, dates back to the 1830s. The pillars holding up the front entrance porchway need to be replaced
Popular wedding venue: Farington Lodge, off Stanifield Lane, dates back to the 1830s. The pillars holding up the front entrance porchway need to be replaced

Plans have been put forward to replace parts of an historic building in Leyland.

The stone columns holding up the front entrance of Farington Lodge, on Stanifield Lane, have become damaged and cracked, and are now deemed ‘structurally inadequate’.

Classic Lodges has submitted a planning application to South Ribble Council to replace them, and have reassured the new pillars will not ruin the appearance of the listed Farington Lodge building, which dates back to the 1800s.

Managing Director of Classic Lodges, Richard Grime said: “It’s critical for us to be able to maintain that great sense of arrival people get when they approach Farington Lodge with the fabulous pillars.

“Unfortunately, the original columns are crumbling and need replacing quickly, but hopefully nobody will be any the wiser when the work has finished.

“People like to stand in front of the entrance for wedding photographs, and they want everything to be perfect.”

Planning permission is needed before any work goes ahead, and temporary supports have been put up in the meantime.

A structural appraisal was carried out about a month ago, which showed that the cracking and damage to the stone columns and capitals were a result of corrosion.

The report recommendations are to replace the columns due to their ‘structural inadequacy’.

Farington historian Joan Langford said: “The original pillars aren’t safe anymore, and I think that the plans to replace them with stone sourced to match the existing sandstone is totally appropriate.

“I understand that it’s a safety issue, and I’m just delighted that the new columns will be in-keeping with the rest of Farington Lodge.”

Farington Lodge is a Georgian Country House Hotel, and was built in the 1830s as a family home. It was once used as a Leyland Motors Guest House, and went into private ownership in 1989 following the insolvency of Leyland DAF, with the current owners taking over in 1994.