Transplant student faces testing time

Papiya Biswas
Papiya Biswas

An inspirational Leyland student will take an A-level exam on the same morning she is due to undergo life-saving surgery.

Papiya Biswas, who attends Runshaw College, suffers from chronic kidney failure and has to endure eight hours of treatment every day.

The 18-year-old had just finished her AS exams last year when she collapsed and was rushed to the doctors.

After a series of tests it was revealed both of her kidneys were working at just a fraction of the rate they normally should.

If Papiya had not been admitted to the doctors when she was, there is a good chance she may no longer be alive.

Papiya is now set to go under the knife as her loving mum is set to donate one of her own kidneys.

Her mum Rita, 45, said: “Papiya is my only daughter and I just want to see her smile back again. We are so happy that I am a kidney match and we are just trying to take everything one step at a time.

“Papiya is such a nice girl and I am so lucky to have her.”

The mother and daughter will be taken into hospital on February 2, the same day she is due to sit A levels in world history, religious studies and psychology.

She said: “I knew it was a very important year for me at college so I asked the doctors to do whatever they could to get me better.

“I told them whatever happened I wanted to go back to college.”

Her mum will be in surgery for two hours, and then the kidney will be given to Papiya in surgery that will take four to five hours.

Her proud dad Bibhu, 52, said: “When Papiya told the doctors she was going to take the exam they just couldn’t believe it.

“Papiya is a little angel. She takes after her mother. If I said she was fine I would be lying but to everyone else has always has a big smile.”

Papiya was admitted to hospital in Manchester last year and spent four weeks going through rigorous treatment.

Waste products in the blood can be measured by creatine levels. In a normal person, the levels should range from 80 to 140.

When Papiya was at her most critical stage, her level was 2600.

She is now hooked up to a dialysis machine for eight hours a day while she sleeps. She still goes to college every day despite her condition, and hopes to one day become a clinical psychologist so she can help others.

Her loving father , who also has to take 29 tablets a day for a kidney condition, said: “Lightning really has struck twice with us.

“You can cope with most things but if your child is ill it feels like someone has taken a knife and cut through your heart.

“She is only 18 years old and you could be 35 and would be going mad about the whole world and blaming everyone. Not once has she done that.

“We have got to take it step by step and we will get there. She has already gone through so much pain.”