The quick Brown Hare jumped over the juicy hen

Fowl revolution is a memorable moment in pub history
Fowl revolution is a memorable moment in pub history

It would be no more than minor exaggeration to say yours truly embarked for the pub under discussion today like Mick the Miller out the traps of White City at the English Greyhound Derbies of 1929 and 1930.

What a dog.

Anyhow, having passed through no suitable doors since last time of asking, The Brown Hare on Penwortham’s Millbrook Way was a late call, chosen not quite at random, mostly for the convenience of location.

Anyhow, mildly ill-informed and lightly taken decision though this was, it turned out to be one with thrilling consequences.

Sold solely on the basis of a personal recommendation, a subsequent cursory squint at the Marston House’s website for research purposes dropped my jaw to desk level in a heartbeat.

This pub has a Rotissamat.

A pub. With a Rotissamat.

Right there, for all to see.
Embedded in a wall, slap bang by the bar, slowly revolving birds, shimmering hot, dripping, the fizz and snap of drooled juice on naked flame...

Primal. Mesmeric. And quite suffice to say I was well and truly in its tender spell within 10 
seconds of sprinting over the threshold.

All-in-all, sheer pub genius and enough to transform what might otherwise be a run-of-the-mill PubCo ‘outlet’ into a place most gents past a certain age would happily spend a straight fortnight.

Half a succulent chicken with spud of choice, veg and gravy six quid. If that don’t float your boat you’ve sunk.

In every other regard there is nothing either objectionable or
inspired about this pub (other than its curious location, tucked in behind a supermarket and a petrol station).

The night we visit a healthy crowd is out to enjoy the ales and ambience, and on both counts they are fairly well served.

Relaxed, friendly and not abrasively lit, with four guest ales to sample and a decent selection of other wines and bottles, it’s a genuinely pleasant place to pass a few hours.

And then there’s the chicken.