A Leyland family’s tribute is used to inspire others to take on Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life in Preston

Marjorie Scott, far right, with her grand-daughters Bethany Rowlands, Megan Rowlands, and daughter Louise Leonard, who took part in last year's Race for Life Preston in memory of Tony Scott
Marjorie Scott, far right, with her grand-daughters Bethany Rowlands, Megan Rowlands, and daughter Louise Leonard, who took part in last year's Race for Life Preston in memory of Tony Scott
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A family who lost a loved one to a brain tumour are urging others to take part in this year’s Race for Life in Preston.

After Marjorie Scott lost her husband Tony to a brain tumour in October 2017, she was determined to keep his memory alive and help a good cause.

Marjorie and Tony Scott, of Leyland. Tony died of cancer in 2017

Marjorie and Tony Scott, of Leyland. Tony died of cancer in 2017

So she and her daughter Louise, 51, and grand-daughters Bethany, 21, and Megan, 17, took part in last year’s Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life Preston to celebrate his life, raising hundreds for the charity.

Tony Scott became poorly in 2016 when he had a few black-outs and acted peculiarly.

Marjorie, 74, feared Tony had suffered a stroke, but an initial scan showed no sign of the condition.

Following an MRI scan doctors told the couple that Tony had glioblastoma which was not curable, but they were able to operate.

Our experience means we understand all too clearly why Cancer Research UK’s work is so important.

Marjorie Scott

Without treatment Tony was expected to have five months to live, but with treatment doctors were confident Tony would live for more than 12 months.

Tony, who was a very fit 73-year-old and had worked all his life as a motorcycle engineer, coped bravely with the treatment.

Following the surgery he needed 15 sessions of radiotherapy at the Rosemere Cancer Centre at Royal Preston Hospital and he was given chemotherapy tablets at home.

Marjorie and Tony, who had been married for 52 years, made the most of their time together and enjoyed some holidays around the UK.

Preston Race for Life 2018

Preston Race for Life 2018

But in summer 2017 following a fall, Tony ended up in hospital again where doctors found a new tumour had grown.

The family were keen to care for Tony at their Leyland home and he died there aged 74.

Marjorie, who now volunteers at Rosemere, is encouraging others to take part in Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life at Moor Park on Sunday, June 16.

She says: “Our experience means we understand all too clearly why Cancer Research UK’s work is so important.

Tony Scott, of Leyland, who died of cancer in 2017

Tony Scott, of Leyland, who died of cancer in 2017

“I had taken part in Race for Life a few times before Tony got ill, but it was an emotional day taking part last year when he had only died the year before.

“But we had a brilliant time together and would urge everyone to take part.

“We are not fit or runners and walked the course with our dog.

“We miss Tony every single day and always talk about him to keep his memory alive.”

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This year, for the first time, Cancer Research UK is also inviting men and children to join the Race for Life.

Race for Life logo 2018

Race for Life logo 2018

Jane Bullock, Cancer Research UK’s Lancashire spokeswoman, added: “We are very grateful to Marjorie and her family for their support.

“Our Race for Life events are fun, colourful, emotional and uplifting.

“You don’t need to be sporty to take part. You don’t have to train, and you certainly don’t need to compete against anyone else.”

Cancer Research UK’s pioneering work into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer has helped save millions of lives.

It receives no funding from the UK government for its life-saving research.

Every step it makes towards beating cancer relies on vital donations from the public.

Cancer Research UK has been at the heart of the progress that has already seen survival in the UK double in the last 40 years.

Today, two in four people survive their cancer for at least 10 years.

Cancer Research UK’s ambition is to accelerate progress so that by 2034, three in four people will survive their cancer for at least 10 years.

The charity supports research into all aspects of cancer through the work of over 4,000 scientists, doctors and nurses.

To enter or for more information on Race for Life today visit www.raceforelife.org or call 0300 123 0770.