Lancashire judge bars African asylum seeker who 'likened himself to a suicide bomber' from seeing his son

The case was heard at the Family Court in Leyland
The case was heard at the Family Court in Leyland
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An African asylum seeker who "likened himself to a suicide bomber" and talked of making "worldwide news" must not see his son, a Lancashire family court judge has ruled.

Judge Ross Duggan has made an order barring the man from having "direct contact" after council social workers with responsibility for the boy's welfare raised concern.

Social workers said the man, who is facing deportation, had made a "comment about abduction" and "likened himself to a suicide bomber".

The man had told the judge, "the day I decide to kill myself, I will not go alone" and had added "if they push it too far, I will make worldwide news".

Judge Duggan has outlined detail of the case in a written ruling after analysing evidence at a private family court hearing in Leyland.

He said the child, who is about 12 months old and lives with his mother, could not be identified in media reports of the case and he has not named the council involved.

The judge said the man, who came from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and was separated from the boy's mother, had mental health issues.

He said immigration officials had already concluded that the man should be deported.

Judge Duggan said comments the man made to social workers had created concern.

"He made a comment about abduction," said the judge.

"He likened himself to a suicide bomber."

Judge Duggan said the man had told the family court hearing: "I do not have any intention to hurt anyone. The day I decide to kill myself, I will not go alone. I am not feeling suicidal.

"I have no intention to hurt anyone but I will defend my family at any cost. The day I decide to kill myself I will not go alone. I am happy to comply with the local authority if they push it too far, I will make worldwide news. I have come to the stage where I have had enough."

The judge said when questioned the man had given an "enigmatic part-explanation" and referred to a "divine duty" to protect the child.

Judge Duggan described the man's words as a "brooding, manipulative, intimidating threat" aimed at "those involved" with the boy.