Nostalgia: Memories of the stationery department at Leyland Motors

Leyland Motors stationery department on a trip to London, in probably the late 1960s. Mabel Pickup is pictured far left. Her sister, Joan Sharrock is next to her
Leyland Motors stationery department on a trip to London, in probably the late 1960s. Mabel Pickup is pictured far left. Her sister, Joan Sharrock is next to her
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The stationery department at Leyland Motors, in Thurston Road, was a hive of busy activity – both in and out of working hours.

Colleagues often organised day trips and one of the highlights of the year was hosting the children’s Christmas party.

Alwyn Brockley, of Leyland, reveals how her mum, Mabel Pickup, enjoyed working at the firm, alongside her sister, Joan Sharrock.

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Alwyn, 75, who also worked at Leyland Motors, in the postage department, says: “My mum worked there until she retired when she was 60.

“It was a massive white building with three floors, which included the stationery department and publicity.

“Mum mum and her colleagues used to look after all the stationery for Leyland Motors, such as envelopes, clocking in cards, paper etc.

“Departments would send a requisition of what they needed and the staff sent it out to them.

“If there were particularly large order, it was always

questioned.

“They also organised all the printing for the firm.

“It was quite a big operation, with five printing machines. They were very loud but in those days they did not have any ear protectors.

“My mum loved working there.

“She used to organise trips for everyone.

“One time they even went to Paris, which was a big thing in those days as people didn’t travel that much. They often went to London to watch a show and stayed overnight.

“Everyone remembers the Christmas parties for the children. They were held above the stationary stores in the canteen.

“The staff from the stationery department used to take the children’s coats and store them there.

“The children used to have to go through my mum’s office for their coats and so they had to cover the shelves with black covers to stop them taking supplies.

“My mum painted gnomes and snow scenes to stick on there to make it look a bit brighter for them.”